Category Archives: Parks and Gardens

Explore and relax in the quieter corners of cities and countries. Take a breath of fresh air in parks and gardens.

Chacmool at the National Anthropology Museum Mexico City

National Anthropology Museum Mexico City

The National Anthropology Museum in Mexico City is an excellent way to discover the human history of Mexico. From the dawn of the human species until the modern day, it covers everything. It was for this reason – that it would inform our travels – that I insisted the museum be one of the first places we visit during our trip to Cuidad de Mexico.

Getting to the Museo Nacional Antropología

Chapultepec Park

The National Anthropology Museum is in the Chapultepec Park district of Mexico City. It is on the north side of the park, above Lago de Chapultepec and Paseo de la Reforma. Its location makes it an opportune destination for entire day’s outing – we combined our day with Chapultepec Castle.

Statue of a Runner

Need to Know:

  • Address: Av Paseo de la Reforma & Calzada Gandhi S/N, Chapultepec Polanco, Miguel Hidalgo, 11560 Ciudad de México, CDMX, Mexico
  • Hours: 9 am – 7 pm (Closed Mondays)
  • Entrance Fee: $70.00 MX pesos. (~$3.70 USD)

Finding Your Way

The museum is very large and has a large avenue leading to it. There are also signs throughout Chapultepec Park that will direct you where to go. Opposite the museum, is a large pole and demonstration ground. Here we witnessed an indigenous ceremony where drum and flute players hang by their feet upside down while spinning to the ground.

Musicians Dangle While Playing

Upon entering the front building you have three options:

  • Left: Gift Shop
  • Right: Special Exhibition
  • Center: Permanent Exhibition

You cannot have backpacks, bags, etc – luckily, the museum provides a “coat storage” for you just behind the gift shop. After that, you can proceed towards the right side of the entrance building where you can purchase your tickets and receive a map.

Entry Building

The Museum

Designed in 1960, the museum is – to say the least – huge. With 23 rooms, each covering a distinct aspect of Mexican heritage, culture, and history, the establishment is the most visited museum in Mexico.

The museum began in 1790 and expanded and moved numerous times over the following centuries. For a while, the collection was housed in Chapultepec Castle, before settling at the current location.

The current design is that of a horseshoe around a large central pond. The buildings are two stories with a courtyard accessible from the bottom floor.

Anthropology Museum Courtyard

Inform the Rest of Your Travels

As I stated above, a big reason I wanted to do the museum, and to do it early, was to inform the rest of our time in Mexico. Our plan was to visit Teotihuacan the following day and Templo Mayor sometime soon after. These massive archaeological sites, I thought, would be better appreciated if we knew about them beforehand. I was right.

Teotihuacan Scale Model

When we entered, the ticket master handed us a map, and circled a few key exhibits. As it was a little bit later in the day, we would not have the time to see the whole museum. You will need at least a whole day to see everything – however, you can still get a great experience even if you only see half. If you have the time and interest, you could spend a second day there too!

We spent around 4 hours in the museum. All the exhibits were kept in top shape, and were highly informative and interesting. One aspect that we particularly enjoyed was how the bottom floor exhibits had their own outdoor exhibit portions as well. These gardens gave fresh air and a more authentic presentation of the artifacts.

Cave Paintings

We put our focus on the Mayans, Olmecs, Aztecs, and Teotihuacan, as well as on the Oaxaca region. Though, we did still manage to see the majority of the museum. It does not disappoint at all.

Exhibition

Human Sacrifices With Jawbone Necklaces

These human sacrifices were found at Templo Mayor. Their hands were bound behind their backs, and were wearing necklaces made of human jawbones.


Temple Reconstruction

A reconstruction of an Aztec temple in one of the many outside exhibits. This is a part of the Tenochtitlan exhibit.

Statue of a God

A stone carving of an Aztec God.

Aztec Sun Calendar

Arguably one of the most recognizable artifacts from the Aztecs – the great stone sun calendar is a huge monolithic carving.

Scale Model of Templo Mayor

A scale model replica of the Templo Mayor complex. The ruins of the complex can be seen in Centro Historico.

Jaguar Statue

The Jaguar is an important animal in the mythologies of the Aztecs.

Stone carving

The Mesoamericans were highly skilled stone workers.

Textiles

Second-floor exhibits display more modern items. Here, we viewed the traditional dress and textiles of the region.

Skeletons

Death was a very important part of the cultures of Mexico and Central America.

Do Visit The National Anthropology Museum

Olmec Stone Head

I really don’t think I can emphasize enough, just how impressive the museum is. It’s excellently curated and should keep you occupied the entire time you are there. The displays are in Spanish, English, and Nahuatl – so don’t worry about understanding if you don’t speak Spanish.

Kyle and Bri
~K~

Victorian Greenhouse

Jevremovac Botanical Garden Belgrade

We enjoy gardens and parks (here’s a post we did a while back about some of the local ones we enjoy around San Jose). In general, they’re a nice place to just go for a stroll – so when we explored Google maps to check out what was around us and found Jevremovac Botanical Garden we decided to give it a go.

Belgrade Botanical Garden Entrance

Finding the Jevremovac Botanical Garden

After a little research we also found that these gardens are allegedly actually one of the most visited natural monuments in Serbia despite not showing up on any “Things to do in Belgrade” type lists we found.

With little time in Serbia you probably won’t get to it but for a longer visit, it’s a nice place to go wander around. We were there over a month. In general, and this is the vibe we get from Belgrade as a whole – we found the area to be peaceful and pleasant.

Walking into the garden
Serbia

A Lovely Space of Green

Altogether the park contains over 2,500 plant species spread over 12 acres. Some have labels to help you identify them.

Plant description
Spring

There are benches throughout certain areas of the park to take in the scenery and sounds of birds.

Park bench

Now, I’m sure the garden may appear different at different times of year, but also keep in mind that it’s not open year-round (info at the bottom).

RoseFlower

Anyway, you can wander about and enjoy the general park/forest garden, but there are also a few specific places within Jevremovac worth mentioning:

The Japanese Garden

Japanese Garden in Jevremovac

We really enjoy the aesthetic of Japanese Gardens. Of course, as far as I can recall we’ve only been to two others – the Japanese Friendship Garden in San Jose and the Japanese Garden on Margaret Island in Budapest (both impressive).

We thought about visiting one in Vancouver, but it was closed the day we planned to visit. This one was a little smaller than the other two but also very pretty.

Jevremovac
Japanese Garden

Not far from it there’s also this little bamboo area you can walk through which is neat.

Bamboo forest

Jevremovac Botanical Garden Greenhouse

Victorian Greenhouse
Outside the greenhouse

The greenhouse on the property was built in Victorian-style – which we enjoyed – in 1892. It was reconstructed again in 1970, 2005, and 2014, and contains over 1,000 species.

Greenhouse

Inside there are all kinds of different intriguing plants, succulents, and cacti.

Succulents
Jevremovac Botanical Garden
Cute Succulents
Succulents garden
Pretty flower
OrchidsWater drops

When we first made it to the greenhouse we saw a couple cats and fortunately had cat treats with us. So we sat and enjoyed the company of one of them – the other one was scared.

Kyle feeding catCute cat

Old Oak

There is also a 150-year-old oak tree inside which is a natural monument itself. (Sorry, don’t have a pic of it.)

Now for a little history: the garden was created in 1874 by the Ministry of Education of Serbia. The first manager (Josif Pancic) is said to be the “father of Serbian botany”. So this place is pretty significant in Serbia in terms of plants. About a decade after its creation, King Jevrem Obrenovic donated the garden to the Great School in Belgrade. He named it Jevremovac in honor of his grandfather.

Plan Your Visit:

Cost: 250 Serbian Dinar (~$2/person)
Address: Takovska 43, Beograd, Serbia
Hours: 9am-7pm May 1 – Nov 1
Note: Keep in mind that this attraction is only open from May through November

Cute flower

~B~

Visiting City Park Budapest

On the Pest side of Budapest, away from the castle district (Buda), you can find the City Park Budapest – or Varosliget Napozoret. This large park contains many iconic and beautiful locations worth visiting in Budapest that may be over looked by some visitors on a shorter stay.

We visited this area several times during our stay in Budapest, each time with the park transitioning more and more from fall to winter.

Kyle and Bri on Castle pond bridge
Andrassy Street

Hero’s Square

When approaching along Andrassy road, also home to the House of Terror, the first and most iconic landmark you’ll come to is Hero’s Square or Hosok tere. It is a major square in Budapest and is noted for it’s statues that feature the Seven Chieftains of the Magyars. It also contains the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Rising from the center is the Millennium Monument, which was completed in 1900.

Hero's Square Budapest

Surrounding the square, you will find the Museum of Fine Arts on the left and the Mucsarnok (palace of art) on the right. Following the paths off to the right, you will find the Timewheel – a giant “hourglass” that is a cool stop if you happen to be nearby. Unfortunately, during our visit, it was broken due to vandalism.

Palace of Art Budapest

Ice Skating Rink City Park Budapest

Proceeding into City Park Budapest, you find the ice skating rink immediately to your right before crossing the bridge.

Front of Ice Skating Building
Ice Skating building from behind

In the winter, the pond in the park is drained and set up to be a large, “natural” skating rink. The facilities provide a large, open place to skate. Opening times of the skating rink are subject to change due to weather, but expect it to open starting around November 23rd most years. Admission is HUF 1000 (~$3.70) on Mondays and Tuesdays, HUF 1500 (~$5.50) on Wednesdays and Thursdays, and HUF 2000 (~$7.40) on Weekends. There are rentals if you don’t have skates for HUF 1500 (~$5.50) for two hours. While a little expensive for our tastes, it still is a good price and was an experience that we really wanted from Budapest.

Ice Skating Rink
Kyle In Skates

Skating the rink at night was nice as it was right underneath the Vajdahunyad Castle. There were three distinct areas to skate: a common circuit rink where you go in a flow with everyone else; a “practice” rink where people were doing ice dancing and acrobatics; and a game area for skaters good enough to play various games. We really enjoyed watching the more skilled skaters.

We didn’t care for the music playing – American Rap and Pop. It didn’t go well with the holiday vibe and took away from the atmosphere. In my mind it would have been better to be holiday music. It is still important to be careful though as there are always random slips that can occur. A wild child managed to take out Briana towards the end of our night.

Interior of Skating House

Vajdahunyad Castle

And speaking of Vajdahunyad Castle – it is a beautiful example of Hungarian castle work. What is not commonly known is it is a recent build. It was constructed in 1896 as for the Millennial Exhibition to celebrate 1000 years of Hungary.

Vajdahunyad Castle and Pond

It features copies of various castles from throughout the Hungarian Empire, including the Hunyad Castle of modern day Transylvania. The designs incorporate architectural styles of Romanesque, Gothic, Renaissance, and Baroque. Originally constructed of cardboard and wood, it was so popular that is was rebuilt from stone and brick only a few years later.

Vajdahunyad Castle from Lake
Vajdahunyad Castle Chapel Relief Sculptures
Vajdahunyad Castle Gates
Vajdahunyad Castle Decorations

Today it is home to the largest agricultural museum in Europe offering tours of the interior.

Approaching Vajdahunyad Castle

Other Notables In City Park Budapest

City Park Budapest is quite large and offers several days worth of exploration. We limited ourselves and only saw what we mentioned above and spent a day at the Szechenyi Baths. Being amongst the most famous of the Budapest baths, it certainly deserves a visit.

Széchenyi thermal bath

You can also visit the Budapest Zoo and Botanical Garden which is in the northern corner of the park. There used to be an amusement park next to it as well, but has since closed. It is only “open” to the adventurous few willing to jump a fence.

The rest of the park offers plenty for kids, families, couples, and solo travelers to explore. Activities range from dining, to skate parks, and outdoor concerts.

Pond surrounding Castle
Wedding Photos in Budapest City Park

While in Budapest, make sure to give the park the attention it deserves.

~K~

City Park Employee