Category Archives: Cyprus

Married With Maps in Cyprus

Cats eating

Video: Our Cyprus Housesit Watching 7 Cats

Cyprus Housesit Video

I first attempted to make an overall Cyprus video, but our “tourist” clips just didn’t blend well with all the cat videos. So this is a video mostly featuring the seven cats we watched in Dhoros. Gotta love cat videos, though!  I will probably make another short video showing some of our activities out, though. Enjoy our Cyprus housesit!

~B~

Swim at the Beach in Cyprus

Being an island in the middle of the Mediterranean, you’d expect Cyprus to have some wonderful beaches, and amazing coastal views – and you’d be right. The island has a wide range of beaches to visit, all with stunning views and great water. While we didn’t get to visit all the locations we would have liked, we still got to see a fair bit, and they all offered something a little different. It was great to finally get to a beach. It was really our first opportunity since we’d left Florida.

So I’m going to go ahead and show off the beaches of Cyprus we visited, in the order that we did.

Pissouri Beach
Pissouri Beach Cyprus

Pissouri Beach was the first of the Cyprus beaches we visited. The homeowners of our house sit were meeting up with friends and they asked us if we’d like to come along. They had decided on Pissouri because of a restaurant they liked as well as the ability to avoid the supposed crowds of Kourion Beach.

The beach here is very rocky. We would have liked to have had water shoes – the homeowners did. But aside from that, it was really quite nice. Cliffs stood out against the sea as gentle waves came ashore.

Pissouri Beach Cyprus

The water was nice, with only a gentle swell and little to no current. You could easily spend hours floating in the water. It was also nice that once you made it about ten feet out, the large stones and pebbles made way for sand and easier walking.

Alykes Beach (Pafos Waterfront) and Municipal Baths
Pafos Swimming Pen

Alykes “Beach” we visited several times, though never actually got in the water. The first time was on my birthday when we decided to go to Pafos to celebrate. We walked past the beach, and discovered that it’s really hard to call it as such. There is no shore to speak of here, but that doesn’t stop hundreds of tourists and locals from enjoying the water.

Lounges and chairs line the waterfront. Ladders and small platforms allow you to enter the water.

Pafos Swimming Platform

As these are also a municipal baths, you find well equipped changing rooms and bathrooms right next to the water as well. The water seemed to be a little rougher here than at Pissouri, but if one was searching for calmer waters, there were walled off sections that could easily be used for younger kids or lap swimming.

Pafos Waterfront Boardwalk

One thing that is certain though, is that the water is crystal clear.

Kourion Beach
Kourion Beach Overlook

Our visit to Kourion Beach was the wind down to a long day trekking the Kourion ruins on the above cliffside with my parents. The beach was certainly a bit more crowded, but when we went all the way down to the end of the beach, we found some more private areas to swim, and enjoy a meal at a local restaurant (the best squid I’ve ever had).

Kourion, like Pissouri, is primarily smooth pebbles and rocks that gives way to sand once out in the water. Gently sloping, with easy waves, it is an enjoyable beach with great views of the surrounding sea cliffs.

Lady’s Mile Beach
Lady's Mile Beach Cyprus

Lady’s Mile Beach is just south and very near to the new Limassol Port. The beach, like the previously mentioned, is primarily a pebble beach. The water is very shallow though, so you can easily wade out into the water without it coming up high on you. The water is normally pretty calm here and can offer you a nice relaxing place to watch the local birds and cargo ships come in.

Lady's Mile Beach Cyprus

The road is a little rough though, so if your car is low-riding or not in good shape, you may not want to try this one out. If you have a 4 wheel drive though, you should have no problems at all.

If you drive far enough, you’ll eventually find sandy beach – but we stayed close to the start because of the rough roads.

Lady's Mile Pebbles
Molos (Limassol Waterfront) Beach
Limassol Beach

A few miles further north along the shore from Lady’s Mile is a nice beach called Molos Beach. This beach is a well-manicured park, that stretches for several miles along the Limassol waterfront. Here, a grassy, shady park lines the shore.

The beach itself is a soft sand, and as such attracts many locals and tourists. Most likely, it will be busy.

We didn’t get out into the water because we were visiting a cat cafe at the time, but we could see the the water was protected with stones a few hundred feet out, to make for a nice and calm swimming experience.

Finikoudes (Larnaka Waterfront) Beach
Larnaka Beach Front

The sandy Finikoudes Beach can be found in Larnaka just past the Tomb of St. Lazarus. A picturesque beach, filled with tourists and locals alike, you’ll find that there are many restaurants, cafes, and shops that line the waterfront.

Larnaka Beachfront

As well, you can visit the Larnaka castle which sits right on the beach.

The water itself gently slopes and remains shallow a fair ways out. You can easily take a stroll in the water without worrying about getting soaked if you don’t want to.

Petra tou Romiou (Aphrodite’s Rock)
Beach Near Aphrodite's Rock

Get In

Down the coast about twenty minutes from Pafos, lies the mythical Petra tou Romiou, also known as Aphrodite’s Rock. According to myth, it is the place that the Greek Goddess Aphrodite was born – emerging from the sea foam.

It is said that if you swim around the rock, you will be granted with youth and graceful aging. We decided to not test this superstition. The water here is pretty rough, and we didn’t want to get thrashed against the rocks.

Instead we elected to have a picnic on the beach with pita, hummus, yogurt, and wine.

Picnic at Aphrodite's Rock

Getting down to the beach can be a little bit tricky, as the tunnel which takes under the road and onto the beach isn’t obvious at first. The entrance is next to the restaurant with the same name.

The beach itself is very much a rocky beach, with stones, pebbles, and boulders primarily being present. Not the greatest place to lay out, but the location is very scenic and quite iconic.

Dive In

The water here, is far rougher than the other beaches as it sits on a point of land that juts out. Strong currents, cold water, and a steep, immediate drop off make this beach not friendly for young or weak swimmers. However, it’s awesome for one key feature: the jumping rock.

About fifteen feet into the water sits a large rock mount. As we witnessed – you can climb it and jump off into the waves. Some of the people were really risky and making huge dives just barely skimming the rocks. Meanwhile, others were showing off with flips.

Aphrodite's Rock Guy Jumping

I decided to jump too, so I followed someone’s lead on climbing the wet, vertical, and sharp rock. It was a little difficult at first to climb, the rock was very slick, sharp, and quite literally vertical. But once about ten feet up, the rock began to slope and it was far easier to climb. It was fun to climb and jump from – I do regret only doing it once.

Kyle Jumping from Aphrodite's Rock

Honorable Mention:

There are many, many more beaches on Cyprus that we simply didn’t make it to for whatever reasons. Check out the key beaches that we wish we had made it to here. We really wish we could got to Ayia Napa:

Cyprus Island

LoveCyprus2Site

~K~

neolithic settlement at choirokoitia cyprus

Choirokoitia Neolithic Site, Cyprus

Cyprus is home to several prehistoric sites across the island, with Choirokoitia being one of the largest, and best preserved sites. It also just so happened to be pretty easily accessible. It lies just off the highway about halfway between Limassol and Larnaka and is a designated UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Hill top at Choirokoitia

We made our way out to the site during the time that Briana’s dad was visiting us. Just like our other adventures out to Tomb of the Kings and Kurion, this would also turn into a hike. 

Being the middle of summer, it was really hot out probably somewhere in the mid to upper 90s so we made sure to bring a fair amount of water and we put on a little sunscreen. The site, like much of the island, is very dry, on the verge of being desert.

Cyprus Thistle

Get In

The site is very well maintained with a visitor entrance, bathrooms, plaques, and some stone pavement. Entrance to the park cost 2.50 Euro per person, so it was not too bad a price.

Entrance
Entry Path

The site lies at one end of a longer hiking trail that will take you to several neolithic sites including the Kalavasos-Tenta (another site you can see off of the highway) and the Byzantine church of the Panagia tou Kambou. However, considering the heat of the day and the fact that the hiking trail was several miles in length, we elected to just see the Choirokoitia site.

This worked out perfectly anyways as we still were able to explore the site itself for around two hours at a leisurely pace. The entire site makes its way around a hill, with several smaller sections to view. Near the entrance, manicured paths take you to various plaques that describe how the aboriginals of Choirokoitia lived on the land as well as about the wildlife, climate, and habitat of the region.

Fig at Choirokoitia
Building at Choirokoitia

Reconstructed Choirokoitia

Several brick and plaster buildings have been preserved and restored that you can view. These buildings show how family units would have lived, with each building serving as a room, arranged in a circular pattern forming a larger familial structure.

Restored Village
Interior of Restored Village

Archaeological Trail

Moving on from here, the path turns more to a worn dirt trail and makes its way around the bend, overlooking what used to be a river. It could still be river, but it was hard to see if there was any water considering the drought. Regardless, in ancient times, the settlement existed due to it’s location next to the Maroni River.

Hillside

Along this section we found the remains of ancient walls and early settlements. It is believed however, that this particular site was later abandoned in favor of a location further up the hill by a few hundred feet.

Archaeological Trail
Wall at Choirokoitia

Main Excavation

When we arrived the larger location we were struck by the enormity of the site. Numerous stone alleyways, rooms, and buildings stood embedded into the hillside. For preservation purposes, you cannot go into the ruins themselves.  A tarp covers the dig to protect from the harsh sun. However, elevated walkways and ramps provide ample viewing of the archaeological dig.

Upper Village Choirokoitia

The structure itself feels small due to the fact that the people of Choirokoitia were between 4’11” and 5’3”. The 300 to 600 inhabitants only lived to 35 years on average.

For reasons unknown, the people of Choirokoitia abruptly abandoned the village around 6000 BCE. The region was not inhabited again for another 1500 years. Recent evidence in Limassol has points to the theory that the people simply moved further west. Mostly likely moving in response to climate pressures. 

Looking at the Restored village

At the top of the village, a viewing platform provides a great view of the surrounding hills and valley.

All in all the site of Choirokoitia is a great place to see. It’s off the beaten tourist path that you’ll encounter near Pafos, but no less amazing. If you want to visit, it is open daily from 8.00 – 17.00.

~K~

Neolithic Cave at Choirokoitia